News

filter

by date

popular articles

What are the Differences Between Grade I and II Listed Buildings?

Historical buildings are commonly split into two categories – Grade I and Grade II listed buildings, but what is the difference between the...

READ MORE
Popular Techniques in Building Restoration

When it comes to restoring a historical building or a heritage site, there is a long and careful process to follow in which one wrong move can...

READ MORE
The Importance of Historical Building Restoration

Here in the UK, we have a wealth of beautiful heritage and listed buildings. Unfortunately, many of these lovely old buildings have fallen into...

READ MORE

Reconstituted Stone Repairs

Jan 14 2019

A concrete disabled access ramp must be surfaced appropriately for safety and practicality. This London school found that their ramp was unsuitable, so they contacted us at Concrete Renovations Ltd.

The Situation

The client’s concrete ramp was designed to enable disabled accessibility but at the time, it was far from suitably equipped. The exposed and unfinished surface of the concrete ramp meant that travelling up and down it on wheels would not only be difficult, but uncomfortable too. Furthermore, the concrete ramp had never been covered with a non-slip material, making it even more challenging to climb and potentially unsafe, too.

Concrete Renovations Ltd were tasked with rectifying the issues, ensuring quality, durability and safety for all the future users of the ramp. Especially as the primary purpose of the ramp was to benefit those with disabilities.

The Execution

Our initial analysis highlighted that the concrete ramp resurfacing procedure would have to involve scrabbling the top layer of the concrete. This was necessary to remove any surface contamination and maintain a consistent level before we began to lay down our resurfacing product. We opted to remove 6mm from the top of the concrete, as this would allow us to match the original height of the ramp after our work was completed.

After the scrabbling was concluded, we opted to cover the ramp using Sikatop 77 due to its durability, high performance and heavy-duty nature; all properties which are essential for a school concrete ramp that will see regular use. To ensure the new surface was non-slip and practical, we drew a soft brush across the uncured material.

Project Showcase

School Chapel, Rutland

This school chapel in Rutland area exhibited the classic signs of corrosion to the mild steel reinforcement causing parts of the stone section to break off.


BEFORE

Reconstituted stone is a very command and widely used alternative to natural stone. To the untrained eye reconstituted stone looks very similar to the real thing, but in fact, contains mild steel reinforcement and is made in a similar manner to pre-cast concrete.

Reconstituted stone is a very command and widely used alternative to natural stone. To the untrained eye reconstituted stone looks very similar to the real thing, but in fact, contains mild steel reinforcement and is made in a similar manner to pre-cast concrete.

AFTER

Reconstituted stone is a very command and widely used alternative to natural stone. To the untrained eye reconstituted stone looks very similar to the real thing, but in fact, contains mild steel reinforcement and is made in a similar manner to pre-cast concrete.

Concrete Renovations Ltd treated the steel reinforcement with a rust inhibitor and carried out repairs to various stone sections on the exterior of the chapel using our colour matched, cementitious restoration mortar to provide a long lasting repair which is sympathetic to the adjacent stone.

The Result

A safer and more durable solution to the school’s disability access needs. 

If you would like to find out more about our concrete ramp resurfacing services, please don’t hesitate to get in touch, or give us a call on 01733 560362 if you have any questions.

back to News

12 Fenlake Business Centre, Fengate, Peterborough , PE1 5BQ

01733 560362

sales@concreterenovations.co.uk

Follow Us