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Popular Techniques in Building Restoration

When it comes to restoring a historical building or a heritage site, there is a long and careful process to follow in which one wrong move can...

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What Work Can Be Performed With Listed Building Consent?

Aug 29 2017
listed-building

When you are responsible for a listed building, performing maintenance work can be a potential minefield with the amount of red tape that tends to present itself. The general rule of thumb is that if any work involves manipulating the structure, such as concrete repairs, then you will require listed building consent from your local council.

If you are ever unsure as to whether any planned work will require prior consent, it is always best to consult a professional or a governing body. It is an offence to carry out work without proper consent, even if you believe that permission would be given.

General Maintenance

Any work that does not affect the character of the building or alteration of the structure will generally be okay to perform without consent. This can include:

  • Interior painting, as long as there is no historical decoration that may be affected
  • Replacement of modern fittings (kitchen and bathroom)
  • Gardening (although you may require permission to cut down trees and erect fences)

Listed documentation that accompanies the building should advise of any internal features that fall under the listing. While most redecoration does not require consent, it is always best to ask just in case there are any hidden features that you are unaware of.

Emergency Repairs

What do you do if the building requires urgent repair work, but you know that you could face a wait of eight and thirteen weeks to receive approval? If you can substantially prove that any work was necessary, such as concrete repairs to a failing structure, in the interest of health and safety, emergency work can take place.

Other instances where emergency works can be carried out are:

  • Securing public health and safety or preserving the building by works of repair, where temporary support or shelter is not practical
  • Work was limited to the minimum measures that were immediately necessary
  • Written notice justifying the work in detail is given to the local council as soon as reasonably practicable

When Listed Building Consent is Required

For any work that alters the look and feel of a listed building, externally or internally, and is not in the case of an emergency in regard to health and safety, you will require listed building consent.

Over time, the structure of the building will begin to deteriorate and show signs of its age. Even though concrete repairs may be required to ensure long-term safety, consent will still have to be given as this will not be deemed an immediate necessity.

For more information on the restoration of historic buildings, such as concrete repairs and other services, please call the Concrete Renovations team on 01733 560 362.

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01733 560362

sales@concreterenovations.co.uk

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